Health & Diet

Coca-Cola And PepsiCo Drinks May Soon Get Healthier, Click Here To Know How

News World India | 0
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| } October 13 , 2017 , 16:07 IST

The harmful effects of cold drinks, aerated sodas and similar beverages is well known, as they are processed, have hidden recipes and are full of harmful sugar and sugar substitutes such as aspartame which are more harmful than sugar.

As health consciousness increases, and people actively opt for healthier beverages, beverage giants Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are planning to change the recipes of some of their best-selling drinks by using a plant-based natural sweetener 'stevia' and reducing the amount of sugar/aspartame.

According to reports, Coca Cola is planning to launch a variant of its popular mango flavoured drink Maaza with almost 30-50 percent less sugar. A variation of Coca Cola's orange soda 'Fanta' is also in the works which would include stevia and 5 percent of orange juice. Similarly, PepsiCo is testing new formulations for its lemony 7UP drink to reduce its calories.

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"As articulated by our global CEO, Coca-Cola has undertaken a three-pronged strategy to give consumers wider choice of low no calorie products, which include reduced serving size, reformulation and innovation," said a Coca-Cola India spokesperson.

"This is work in progress and we intend to share a comprehensive plan by the end of 2017," he added.

Aspartame, used frequently to replace sugar is an artificial sweetener which has been linked to deadly health conditions such as seizures, cancer, weight gain and birth defects. In comparison, the plant-based stevia is considered significantly healthier and many companies are making the shift from using aspartame to stevia.  

Senior director at B2B stevia supplier South Asia at PureCircle, Ajay Chandran said, "Globally, around 14,000 products have been launched with stevia and many companies in India are experimenting with it currently."

However, reformulation is not always an easy process, especially for foot items/drinks with an established taste. In 1985, Coke had launched a reformulated version of its flagship drink, only to face backlash and withdraw it 3 months later.